The Importance of the Filibuster and Other Jokes

There’s no way out of this filibuster said the Joker to the Thief. I, for one, loved the way McConnell told his obscene jokes about the Senate filibuster. Did you see him say: “There is an overwhelming majority, on a bipartisan basis, not interested in changing the way the Senate operates on the legislative calendar”? And he said it with a straight face! Of course there is a broad bipartisan majority; the broadest part being comprised of 48 fat Democratic obstructionist senators who despise liberty more than conservatives hate Marxism.

Then, when the Thief, Chuckie Schumer, responded so succinctly, “I think the idea of using the nuclear option for legislative stuff is pretty much dead,” we could hear his silent, rasping, chuckle: Rats feet on splintered glass in the back allies of K-Street.

Oh, but that joker McConnell. Do you know what he said next? He said getting rid of the 60 vote push-button filibuster would “fundamentally change the way the Senate has worked for a very long time.” Yea, he actually said the Senate worked. Mitch McConnell live! You can’t beat that with a stick.

…No, no, you can’t. That hasn’t been done since Democratic Senator Preston Brooks beat Republican Abolitionist Charles Sumner in 1856. That happened way before the push-button filibuster was even born,  proving that the antiquity of a Senate tradition is not evidence of its beneficial character. Besides, McConnell’s self-effacing humor is so endearing. Did you know McConnell himself is older than the push-button filibuster? Did you hear him, “the way the Senate has worked for a for a VERY LONG time…” That McConnell’s a rip.

Anyhow, the current tradition of the gentleman’s filibuster has only been around since the U.S. Senate revised Rule 22 in 1975. From that time forward, no senator needed to speak for a filibuster to be in force. Today, one simply files a motion. Since 1975, then, a filibuster has no longer been a filibuster, a simple abuse of the constitutional liberty of free speech; instead, it has become simply an abuse of the constitution. Rule 22’s revision made it slightly easier to attain cloture and move legislation, but Rule 22 made it much, much easier to enact a filibuster. It is not surprising, then, that since the enactment of Rule 22, the number of filibusters has sky-rocketed.

You know what’s interesting? A comparison between the rise in the national debt and the rise in the use of the 1975 “gentleman’s” filibuster!

Yea, the Senate “works.” Oh, that is rich, and McConnell tells it so well. That kindly, silly, old, supercilious joker. I know the thieves of K-Street get it. It’ll just be a shame when McConnell retires.

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